PETA to Brown University: Heads Should Roll for Animal-Care Incompetence

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Update: The abuse and neglect of animals imprisoned at Brown University continue. An inspection report released today by the U.S. Department of Agriculture documents yet another incident in which animals suffered and died at the hands of the school's apparently incompetent staff.

This time, staff forgot to feed two bats. One was found dead in a cage, and the other died later.

Remembering to feed animals would seem to be a very basic requirement of staff. Appalling as this is, it's just the latest in a string of shameful violations of the federal Animal Welfare Act at Brown going back years. Please help us prevent even more suffering by taking action below.

Badly injured monkey in lab
Every year in the U.S., more than 105,000 primates are imprisoned in laboratories, where they are abused and killed in invasive, painful, and terrifying experiments.

PETA has uncovered a newly posted U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspection report that documents, once again, that animals imprisoned in Brown University laboratories are victims of the school's neglect and incompetence.

In this latest federal Animal Welfare Act violation—which the USDA categorized as "critical"—two macaque monkeys were injured so severely that both required surgery after university employees failed to secure latches on a cage, allowing one animal to enter the other's enclosure.

This is hardly the first time that the university's staff members have demonstrated their carelessness and incompetence when it comes to how they treat the animals in their laboratories.

Just last year, a USDA inspection report documented that a similar incident occurred in which a monkey escaped from his or her enclosure and sustained injuries—also requiring surgery—following an altercation with another monkey. That escape also occurred after personnel failed to secure the enclosure adequately. In 2014, three bats died after staff failed to feed them. In 2012, three ferrets escaped from their enclosures—again, as a result of a staff error.

In 2010, the USDA found that Brown's Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) failed to ensure the psychological well-being of young monkeys held captive there. Another monkey went without water for 72 hours when his or her care was overlooked by staff. The IACUC's poor oversight also resulted in suffering and death for animals used in experimental surgeries.

An institution's animal care and use committee serves as the last line of defense for animals who are held in laboratories and used in experiments that may cause them pain, discomfort, and distress—and that almost always end in their deaths. But Brown's IACUC is failing woefully at providing this oversight.

Take action by joining us in asking the president of Brown University to replace the IACUC members immediately, as a first step, with more qualified individuals who are capable of ensuring compliance with federal animal-welfare regulations and to pursue superior, animal-free methods of research that actually offer patients hope of treatments and cures.

Help us speak up for animals imprisoned at Brown University!

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Christina
Paxson
Brown University

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