It's Time That the Orange Bowl 'Peeled' Away From Animal Exploitation

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The Capital One Orange Bowl has a history of partnering with the Miami Seaquarium—most notably by promoting a cruel stunt in which a dolphin is forced to "choose" the winner of the Orange Bowl, all while swimming in endless circles in a concrete tank. At the Miami Seaquarium, the orca Lolita is held in the smallest, oldest orca tank in the world, and she's suffered without the companionship of anyone of her own species for nearly 40 years.

To make things worse, the 2018 Orange Bowl has two events scheduled at Jungle Island—a cruel tourist trap that forces lemurs, sloths, and other wild animals to participate in dangerous direct-contact interactions with the public. There are countless entertainment options in South Florida that don't involve exploiting animals. Please join PETA in urging the Orange Bowl to commit to not promoting the Miami Seaquarium, Jungle Island, or any other facility that keeps animals in captivity in the future.

Jungle Island (formerly "Parrot Island") has been cited multiple times by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for violations of the federal Animal Welfare Act—including failing to provide adequate veterinary care, failing to maintain proper records, and failing to have direct control of primates during public encounters, among other offenses. On one occasion, a gibbon escaped from his enclosure and entered a pen holding tigers, where he was injured. One tiger then scaled a 12-foot-tall barrier and escaped, and the animal wasn't recaptured until about an hour later. During the panic, several people were reportedly injured, including a 15-month-old baby and one visitor who had to be hospitalized.

In nature, lemurs like those at Jungle Island are highly social primates who live in complex, matriarchal societies and spend most of their time in trees. Those used for public interactions are typically taken away from their mothers shortly after birth, which can lead them to develop neurotic, abnormal behavior patterns indicative of psychological stress. Adults are often bred repeatedly in order to create a constant supply of new babies for public encounters—until they become too old or exhausted, at which point they may be discarded or left to languish inside small cages.

Audiences have made it clear that they don't want to see captive animals exploited for entertainment, as evidenced by California's ban on orca breeding and Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus' closure after 146 years of animal exploitation. It's time for the Orange Bowl to do right by animals and commit to not promoting the Miami Seaquarium, Jungle Island, or any other facility that keeps animals in captivity.

Eric L.
Poms
Orange Bowl

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